Items 1-31 of 117
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1

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

Brick Bricks

1965

Stoneware; ht. 17.5, wd. 34, dp. 10 in. 

In 1965, in a search for new form and content, Arneson began to make “bricks”. Jonathan Fineberg writes of this in his book A Troublesome Subject: The Art of Robert Arneson (University of California Press, 2013 p.65), noting “The bricks were a burlesque of conventional ceramics; like the toilet it is an ordinary ceramic object that was not normally a subject for art”. The “brick” was the basis for one of his masterpieces and largest works, Fragment of Western Civilization (1972). He worked with this format on and off, sometimes using bricks as a plinth for larger figurative work, into the 1980’s.

2

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

Arneson Brick with Finger Protruding

ca 1965

Stoneware; 6, wd. 9, dp. 3 in. 

In 1965, in a search for new form and content, Arneson began to make “bricks”. Jonathan Fineberg writes of this in his book A Troublesome Subject: The Art of Robert Arneson (University of California Press, 2013 p.65), noting “The bricks were a burlesque of conventional ceramics; like the toilet it is an ordinary ceramic object that was not normally a subject for art”. The “brick” was the basis for one of his masterpieces and largest works, Fragment of Western Civilization (1972). He worked with this format on and off, sometimes using bricks as a plinth for larger figurative work, into the 1980’s.

3

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

Arneson River Brick

ca 1969

Stoneware; ht. 4.75, wd. 8.75, dp. 2.75 in.  

In 1965, in a search for new form and content, Arneson began to make “bricks”. Jonathan Fineberg writes of this in his book A Troublesome Subject: The Art of Robert Arneson (University of California Press, 2013 p.65), noting “The bricks were a burlesque of conventional ceramics; like the toilet it is an ordinary ceramic object that was not normally a subject for art”. The “brick” was the basis for one of his masterpieces and largest works, Fragment of Western Civilization (1972). He worked with this format on and off, sometimes using bricks as a plinth for larger figurative work, into the 1980’s. 

4

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

"Arneson" Brick

ca 1969

Stoneware; ht. 4.75, wd. 9.25 , dp. 3.25 in. 

In 1965, in a search for new form and content, Arneson began to make “bricks”. Jonathan Fineberg writes of this in his book A Troublesome Subject: The Art of Robert Arneson (University of California Press, 2013 p.65), noting “The bricks were a burlesque of conventional ceramics; like the toilet it is an ordinary ceramic object that was not normally a subject for art”. The “brick” was the basis for one of his masterpieces and largest works, Fragment of Western Civilization (1972). He worked with this format on and off, sometimes using bricks as a plinth for larger figurative work, into the 1980’s.

5

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

"Arneson" Brick

1969

Stoneware; ht. 4.5, wd. 9, dp. 2.75 in.

Edition #6/10 

In 1965, in a search for new form and content, Arneson began to make “bricks”. Jonathan Fineberg writes of this in his book A Troublesome Subject: The Art of Robert Arneson (University of California Press, 2013 p.65), noting “The bricks were a burlesque of conventional ceramics; like the toilet it is an ordinary ceramic object that was not normally a subject for art”. The “brick” was the basis for one of his masterpieces and largest works, Fragment of Western Civilization (1972). He worked with this format on and off, sometimes using bricks as a plinth for larger figurative work, into the 1980’s.

5

William Baziotes (American, 1912-1963)

Pair of Modernist Still Lifes

oil on canvas (each)

signed u.r. on verso of first painting pictured (covered by frame) 

each housed in original frame

15.5 x 21.5 in. (sight of each)

The reverse of each canvas has a portion of the same nude portrait of a woman. The canvases were repurposed to paint the still lifes.

One of the still lifes offered in this lot is featured as lot 92 in Important Twentieth Century Unreserved Art Auction of Recently Discovered Works by William Baziotes Catalog, From the Private Collection of Constance and the Late Harry Baziotes.

6

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

Mountain Brick
ca 1969
Earthenware; ht. 8.5, wd. 9, dp. 2.75 in. 

 In 1965, in a search for new form and content, Arneson began to make “bricks”. Jonathan Fineberg writes of this in his book A Troublesome Subject: The Art of Robert Arneson (University of California Press, 2013 p.65), noting “The bricks were a burlesque of conventional ceramics; like the toilet it is an ordinary ceramic object that was not normally a subject for art”. The “brick” was the basis for one of his masterpieces and largest works, Fragment of Western Civilization (1972). He worked with this format on and off, sometimes using bricks as a plinth for larger figurative work, into the 1980’s.

Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$5,100
10/28/2016

7

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

"Arneson" Brick 

1969

Earthenware; ht. 4.5, wd. 9, dp. 3 in. 
Edition #10/10 

In 1965, in a search for new form and content, Arneson began to make “bricks”. Jonathan Fineberg writes of this in his book A Troublesome Subject: The Art of Robert Arneson (University of California Press, 2013 p.65), noting “The bricks were a burlesque of conventional ceramics; like the toilet it is an ordinary ceramic object that was not normally a subject for art”. The “brick” was the basis for one of his masterpieces and largest works, Fragment of Western Civilization (1972). He worked with this format on and off, sometimes using bricks as a plinth for larger figurative work, into the 1980’s.

8

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

Arneson Brick Composed of Several Small Bricks

ca 1969

Stoneware; ht. 4.25, wd. 8.75, dp. 3.75 in. 

In 1965, in a search for new form and content, Arneson began to make “bricks”. Jonathan Fineberg writes of this in his book A Troublesome Subject: The Art of Robert Arneson (University of California Press, 2013 p.65), noting “The bricks were a burlesque of conventional ceramics; like the toilet it is an ordinary ceramic object that was not normally a subject for art”. The “brick” was the basis for one of his masterpieces and largest works, Fragment of Western Civilization (1972). He worked with this format on and off, sometimes using bricks as a plinth for larger figurative work, into the 1980’s.

9

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

Untitled, Brick Box
ca 1969
Earthenware; ht. 3, wd. 9, dp. 4.5 in.

In 1965, in a search for new form and content, Arneson began to make “bricks”. Jonathan Fineberg writes of this in his book A Troublesome Subject: The Art of Robert Arneson (University of California Press, 2013 p.65), noting “The bricks were a burlesque of conventional ceramics; like the toilet it is an ordinary ceramic object that was not normally a subject for art”. The “brick” was the basis for one of his masterpieces and largest works, Fragment of Western Civilization (1972). He worked with this format on and off, sometimes using bricks as a plinth for larger figurative work, into the 1980’s.

 

10

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

Untitled, Slab Form with Handle and Ochre Glaze

1964
Earthenware; ht. 13.5, wd. 10, dp. 5 in.
 
The mawkish yet erotic mid-60’s vessels are a form of exorcism. Arneson is expelling the pottery tradition and abstract expressionism at the same time, two elements that were powerful influences when he was beginning his career and against which he rebelled. It also suggests a flushing out of certain European Modernism as well, such as the fluid art of Arp, leading to an all-American vision of inverted Pop.

These vessel/sculptures are profound and important works, his Rosetta Stones in a sense, and are necessary for understanding Arneson’s later oeuvre. It captures his approach to clay, an aesthetic that so deliberately lacked overt refinement that many, wrongly, described his style as amateurish. Indeed its squishy fecundity was carefully developed and remained with him through the 1960’s even with his figurative work, until he began his portraits, to exhibit more “conventional” skill with his superb large-scale modeling of busts and other works. 

 

11

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

Untitled, Footed Vessel with Blue and White Glaze

ca 1694

Glazed Stoneware; ht. 13.25, dia. 8.25 in.

Artist signature on base.

The mawkish yet erotic mid-60’s vessels are a form of exorcism. Arneson is expelling the pottery tradition and abstract expressionism at the same time, two elements that were powerful influences when he was beginning his career and against which he rebelled. It also suggests a flushing out of certain European Modernism as well, such as the fluid art of Arp, leading to an all-American vision of inverted Pop.

These vessel/sculptures are profound and important works, his Rosetta Stones in a sense, and are necessary for understanding Arneson’s later oeuvre. It captures his approach to clay, an aesthetic that so deliberately lacked overt refinement that many, wrongly, described his style as amateurish. Indeed its squishy fecundity was carefully developed and remained with him through the 1960’s even with his figurative work, until he began his portraits, to exhibit more “conventional” skill with his superb large-scale modeling of busts and other works. 

12

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

Untitled, Stomach Form

1969

Glazed Stoneware; ht. 10.5, wd. 13.5, dp. 9 in. 

Incised Artist signature and date on base.

The mawkish yet erotic mid-60’s vessels are a form of exorcism. Arneson is expelling the pottery tradition and abstract expressionism at the same time, two elements that were powerful influences when he was beginning his career and against which he rebelled. It also suggests a flushing out of certain European Modernism as well, such as the fluid art of Arp, leading to an all-American vision of inverted Pop.

These vessel/sculptures are profound and important works, his Rosetta Stones in a sense, and are necessary for understanding Arneson’s later oeuvre. It captures his approach to clay, an aesthetic that so deliberately lacked overt refinement that many, wrongly, described his style as amateurish. Indeed its squishy fecundity was carefully developed and remained with him through the 1960’s even with his figurative work, until he began his portraits, to exhibit more “conventional” skill with his superb large-scale modeling of busts and other works. 

Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$5,100
10/28/2016

13

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

Untitled, with Red Glaze Clef

1964

Glazed Stoneware; ht. 11.5, wd. 13.5, dp. 6.5 in. 

Incised Artist signature and date at foot.

The mawkish yet erotic mid-60’s vessels are a form of exorcism. Arneson is expelling the pottery tradition and abstract expressionism at the same time, two elements that were powerful influences when he was beginning his career and against which he rebelled. It also suggests a flushing out of certain European Modernism as well, such as the fluid art of Arp, leading to an all-American vision of inverted Pop.

These vessel/sculptures are profound and important works, his Rosetta Stones in a sense, and are necessary for understanding Arneson’s later oeuvre. It captures his approach to clay, an aesthetic that so deliberately lacked overt refinement that many, wrongly, described his style as amateurish. Indeed its squishy fecundity was carefully developed and remained with him through the 1960’s even with his figurative work, until he began his portraits, to exhibit more “conventional” skill with his superb large-scale modeling of busts and other works. 

Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$4,200
10/28/2016

14

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

Untitled, with Red Orifice

ca 1964

Glazed Stoneware; ht. 8, wd. 7, dp. 8.5 in.

The mawkish yet erotic mid-60’s vessels are a form of exorcism. Arneson is expelling the pottery tradition and abstract expressionism at the same time, two elements that were powerful influences when he was beginning his career and against which he rebelled. It also suggests a flushing out of certain European Modernism as well, such as the fluid art of Arp, leading to an all-American vision of inverted Pop.

These vessel/sculptures are profound and important works, his Rosetta Stones in a sense, and are necessary for understanding Arneson’s later oeuvre. It captures his approach to clay, an aesthetic that so deliberately lacked overt refinement that many, wrongly, described his style as amateurish. Indeed its squishy fecundity was carefully developed and remained with him through the 1960’s even with his figurative work, until he began his portraits, to exhibit more “conventional” skill with his superb large-scale modeling of busts and other works. 

15

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

Untitled, with Three Green Stripes

1964

Stoneware; ht. 10, wd. 7.5, dp. 8.5 in. 

Incised date on base.

 The mawkish yet erotic mid-60’s vessels are a form of exorcism. Arneson is expelling the pottery tradition and abstract expressionism at the same time, two elements that were powerful influences when he was beginning his career and against which he rebelled. It also suggests a flushing out of certain European Modernism as well, such as the fluid art of Arp, leading to an all-American vision of inverted Pop.

These vessel/sculptures are profound and important works, his Rosetta Stones in a sense, and are necessary for understanding Arneson’s later oeuvre. It captures his approach to clay, an aesthetic that so deliberately lacked overt refinement that many, wrongly, described his style as amateurish. Indeed its squishy fecundity was carefully developed and remained with him through the 1960’s even with his figurative work, until he began his portraits, to exhibit more “conventional” skill with his superb large-scale modeling of busts and other works. 

16

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

Untitled, with Blue Glazed Arrow
1964
Earthenware; ht. 9.26, wd.  15, dp. 7.75 in.

The mawkish yet erotic mid-60’s vessels are a form of exorcism. Arneson is expelling the pottery tradition and abstract expressionism at the same time, two elements that were powerful influences when he was beginning his career and against which he rebelled. It also suggests a flushing out of certain European Modernism as well, such as the fluid art of Arp, leading to an all-American vision of inverted Pop.

These vessel/sculptures are profound and important works, his Rosetta Stones in a sense, and are necessary for understanding Arneson’s later oeuvre. It captures his approach to clay, an aesthetic that so deliberately lacked overt refinement that many, wrongly, described his style as amateurish. Indeed its squishy fecundity was carefully developed and remained with him through the 1960’s even with his figurative work, until he began his portraits, to exhibit more “conventional” skill with his superb large-scale modeling of busts and other works. 

Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$2,520
10/28/2016

17

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

Golden Rod
1969
Stoneware; ht. 7.75, wd. 8, dp. 11.5 in. 
Incised and stamped signature and date on base. 

Arneson’s teapots are extraordinary, their rampant spouts (with roughly carved pubic hair) and other orifices leave nothing to the imagination and they pushed the pornographic button even then. Today they are startlingly lewd. An amusing Arneson touch is their titles. Arneson’s verbal visual play was significant in much of his art and language, often composed to increase shock or outrage. 

Their genesis is more profound than one might think given the domestic cliché of the teapot and the coy “naughtiness” of the spout. Teapots were a basis of rebirth. Arneson had become somewhat rudderless, he was taking on everything and yet concerned about a real direction. Amongst other things he wanted to “reacquaint myself with the material” and as Fineberg explains: “Decided to ‘do some of the disciplinary projects I was unable to do when I went to art school. One of the problems was to do a teapot and I could never do it. So I tried to redeem myself.’  He made ‘thirty eight teapots in celebration of my thirty eight years…I adorned them with some of my personal styles, testicles or mouth, tongues. I mean just a lot of dumb stuff.’ He finished them up in 1969 and showed them at Allan Stone Gallery in 1969.”

Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$18,000
10/28/2016

18

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

Post & Rail Teapot
1969
Stoneware; ht. 9.5, wd. 9, dp. 7.5 in. 
Incised signature and date on base of teapot. 

Arneson’s teapots are extraordinary, their rampant spouts (with roughly carved pubic hair) and other orifices leave nothing to the imagination and they pushed the pornographic button even then. Today they are startlingly lewd.

An amusing Arneson touch is their titles. Arneson’s verbal visual play was significant in much of his art and language, often composed to increase shock or outrage. basis of rebirth. Arneson had become somewhat rudderless, he was taking on everything and yet concerned about a real direction. Amongst other things he wanted to “reacquaint myself with the material” and as Fineberg explains: “Decided to ‘do some of the disciplinary projects I was unable to do when I went to art school. One of the problems was to do a teapot and I could never do it. So I tried to redeem myself.’  He made ‘thirty eight teapots in celebration of my thirty eight years…I adorned them with some of my personal styles, testicles or mouth, tongues. I mean just a lot of dumb stuff.’ He finished them up in 1969 and showed them at Allan Stone Gallery in 1969.”

Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$13,200
10/28/2016

19

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

A Pot of TEA
1969
Stoneware; ht. 8.25, wd. 8, dp. 7.5 in.
Incised signature and date on base of teapot.

Arneson’s teapots are extraordinary, their rampant spouts (with roughly carved pubic hair) and other orifices leave nothing to the imagination and they pushed the pornographic button even then. Today they are startlingly lewd. An amusing Arneson touch is their titles. Arneson’s verbal visual play was significant in much of his art and language, often composed to increase shock or outrage. 

Their genesis is more profound than one might think given the domestic cliché of the teapot and the coy “naughtiness” of the spout. Teapots were a basis of rebirth. Arneson had become somewhat rudderless, he was taking on everything and yet concerned about a real direction. Amongst other things he wanted to “reacquaint myself with the material” and as Fineberg explains:“Decided to ‘do some of the disciplinary projects I was unable to do when I went to art school. One of the problems was to do a teapot and I could never do it. So I tried to redeem myself.’  He made ‘thirty eight teapots in celebration of my thirty eight years I adorned them with some of my personal styles, testicles or mouth, tongues. I mean just a lot of dumb stuff.’ He finished them up in 1969 and showed them at Allan Stone Gallery in 1969.”

Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$22,800
10/28/2016

20

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

Billy Tea is Made in a Bushman's Kettle
1969
Stoneware; ht. 8, wd. 11, dp. 7.75 in.
Incised signature and date on the base of teapot.

Arneson’s teapots are extraordinary, their rampant spouts (with roughly carved pubic hair) and other orifices leave nothing to the imagination and they pushed the pornographic button even then. Today they are startlingly lewd.

An amusing Arneson touch is their titles. Arneson’s verbal visual play was significant in much of his art and language, often composed to increase shock or outrage. But with the teapots he mostly gave them polite titles from Australian tea drinking habits like Billy’s Tea is Made in a Bushman’s Kettle.

Their genesis is more profound than one might think given the domestic cliché of the teapot and the coy “naughtiness” of the spout. Teapots were a basis of rebirth. Arneson had become somewhat rudderless, he was taking on everything and yet concerned about a real direction. Amongst other things he wanted to “reacquaint myself with the material” and as Fineberg explains:  “Decided to ‘do some of the disciplinary projects I was unable to do when I went to art school. One of the problems was to do a teapot and I could never do it. So I tried to redeem myself.’  He made ‘thirty eight teapots in celebration of my thirty eight years…I adorned them with some of my personal styles, testicles or mouth, tongues. I mean just a lot of dumb stuff.’ He finished them up in 1969 and showed them at Allan Stone Gallery in 1969.”

Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$13,200
10/28/2016

21

Robert Arneson (1930-1992; USA)

"NO!" Cup 
ca 1965
Stoneware; ht. 4.75, wd. 5, dp. 3.25 in.
Incised signature on base.

Arneson was the father of "Ceramic Funk," the Bay Area's movement in the early 1960s and a title he did not enjoy. An incident in 1979, while working with a filmmaker doing a documentary on the exhibition A Century in Ceramics in the United States, underscores Arneson's irreverence. The director asked me to pose Arneson the question, "What is the meaning of art?" I refused so the director posed the question. Arneson responded by pushing his finger as far up his nose as he could and then sitting there silently staring at the camera until the annoyed director yelled, "Cut!" 

22

David Gilhooly (1943-2013; USA)

California Landscape Covered Vessel
ca 1968
Glazed Stoneware; ht. 11, dia. 12.5 in.

David Gilhooly was an early member of the 1960s Bay Area "Funk Clay Pack" that included his teacher, Robert Arneson. In common with others in the group, Gilhooly created his own culture and based it on the bright green frog along with other bizarre concepts of animal/human culture. 

 

23

David Gilhooly (1943-2013, USA)

The Temptation and the Exclusion by Michelangelo Frog
ca 1968
Glazed Earthenware; ht. 11 wd. 10.5 in. 

David Gilhooly was an early member of the 1960s Bay Area "Funk Clay Pack" that included his teacher, Robert Arneson. In common with others in the group, Gilhooly created his own culture and based it on the bright green frog along with other bizarre concepts of animal/human culture. 

Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$2,280
10/28/2016

24

David Gilhooly (1943-2013; USA)

Cephalopods: Devonian Era
ca 1970
Earthenware; wd. 6, ht. 4.5, dp. 9 in. 

David Gilhooly was an early member of the 1960s Bay Area "Funk Clay Pack" that included his teacher, Robert Arneson. In common with others in the group, Gilhooly created his own culture and based it on the bright green frog along with other bizarre concepts of animal/human culture. 

Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$336
10/28/2016

25

David Gilhooly (1943-2013, USA)

Primitive Frogs (Devonian Era 40 Million Years Ago) First Animals to Walk on Land
1970
Earthenware; ht. 4, wd. 10.25, dp. 13.5 in.
Artist signature and date, Gilhooly 70, incised on base.

David Gilhooly was an early member of the 1960s Bay Area "Funk Clay Pack" that included his teacher, Robert Arneson. In common with others in the group, Gilhooly created his own culture and based it on the bright green frog along with other bizarre concepts of animal/human culture. 

26

David Gilhooly (1943-2013; USA)

Pipes: Frog Medusa, Frog Dracula, Frogenstein, and Frog Beauty
1970
Stoneware; largest lg. 4.75, wd. 2.5 in. 
Artist signature and dated incised on base of each. 

David Gilhooly was an early member of the 1960s Bay Area "Funk Clay Pack" that included his teacher, Robert Arneson. In common with others in the group, Gilhooly created his own culture and based it on the bright green frog along with other bizarre concepts of animal/human culture. 

27

Marc Chagall (Russian-French, 1887-1985)

L'Artiste Phenix (Artist as a Phoenix )
 
lithograph on Arches
 
signed l.r.
 
numbered 23/50 l.l. 
 
1970s
 
framed
 
28.5 x 21.25  in. (sight)
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$2,760
10/28/2016

28

David Gilhooly (1943-2013; USA)

Bach and David Gilhooly
1969
Stoneware; each 8, wd. 1.5, dp. 2.5 in.
Incised signature and date on the base of Bach.

David Gilhooly was an early member of the 1960s Bay Area "Funk Clay Pack" that included his teacher, Robert Arneson. In common with others in the group, Gilhooly created his own culture and based it on the bright green frog along with other bizarre concepts of animal/human culture. 

 

Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$480
10/28/2016

29

David Gilhooly (1943-2013; USA)

Warthog
ca 1970
Earthenware; ht. 10.5, wd. 17, dp. 27 in.  

David Gilhooly was an early member of the 1960s Bay Area "Funk Clay Pack" that included his teacher, Robert Arneson. In common with others in the group, Gilhooly created his own culture and based it on the bright green frog along with other bizarre concepts of animal/human culture. 
Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$1,560
10/28/2016
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