October 06, 2016 12:00 PM EDT Cincinnati


111

Letters to Louis Wiley from Washington and New York Politicians, Business Leaders, Lawyers, Actors, Actresses, and More

Lot of 161 miscellaneous autographs and letters to Louis Wiley. 

ANS, 2pp (5.5 x 7 in.) on Ritz-Carlton Hotel stationery, 31 March 1934. Sympathy to Wiley on the death of his mother, signed Marie Louise de Serrana? Pencil note on verso indicates "Ambassador from Cuba" but we have so far been unable to identify this person.

TNS, 5.5 x 6.75 in., Washington (DC), n.d. Signed George B. Cortelyou (1862-1940), Secretary of Commerce and Labor (1903-1904), Postmaster General (1905-1907), Secretary of the Treasury (1907-1909) under Roosevelt.

TLS, 7 x 9 in., on Dept of Commerce and Labor letterhead, also signed George B. Cortelyou.

TLS, 1p, on War Department, Chief of Staff, Military Intelligence Division letterhead, Washington (DC), 28 Aug. 1934. Signed Robert C. Richardson Jr., Lt. Col., General Staff. Robert Charlwood Richardson (1882-1954) graduated from USMA in 1904, and was sent to serve in the Philippines. He later saw service in both World Wars, in command of the Hawaiian Department of the Pacific at the height of the second World War (1943-1946) as a Lieutenant General. He was posthumously awarded a fourth star.

ANS, 4 x 5 in. note card and cover, both with red borders. Return address indicates the writer is Jouett Shouse (without which the handwriting would not be interpretable). Washington, 20 Dec. 1934 (postmark). Note: "With all good wishes for Christmas and the coming year." Jouett Shouse (1879-1968) was a publisher and politician, known for his opposition to the New Deal in the 1930s.

Western Union Telegraph, 30 Mar 1933, birthday greetings to Mrs. Regina Wiley from James W. Gerard. James Watson Gerard (1867-1951) was a New York lawyer and politician. In 1914, Gerard defeated Franklin D. Roosevelt in the Democratic primary for US Senator (but lost the election to James Wadsworth, Jr.). He was appointed Ambassador to Germany in 1913, and remained until 1917, just before the US declared war on Germany. After war broke out, Gerard handled British interests in Germany, providing much care to British POWs.

TNS, 1p, New York, Jan. 25, 1935, on letterhead of James W. Gerard and signed by him.

TNS, 5.5 x 8.75 in., on letterhead of the Agent General for Reparation Payments, Berlin, 15 Dec. 1927. Signed S. Parker Gilbert. Before serving as Agent General for Reparations Seymour Parker Gilbert (1892-1938) was Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, and afterward became an associate of J.P. Morgan. After his death of a heart attack at the age of 45, his widow married Harold Stanley, co-founder of Morgan Stanley.

TNS, 1p, on Treasury Department letterhead, New York, March 25, 1920. Signed simply "Bill." Pencil note: "File Wm. Edwards." William Hanford "Big Bill" Edwards (1877-1943) was a Princeton football star, who transitioned to officiating after graduation, refereeing some notable games such as Harvard-Yale and the first "Ohio League" championship game. He was the first president of the first iteration of the AFL (which only lasted that one season).

TLS, approx. 7 x 9 in., [Washington], May 11, 1934. Signed by Postmaster General James A. Farley (1888-1976). Farley was an early "success story" from the Irish Catholic community. He helped normalize diplomatic relations with the Vatican between the wars. During WWII as head of Coca Cola International, he greatly extended the reach of the company overseas by having Coke shipped with food and ammunition as a "war priority item" to boost troop morale.

ANS, 4.5 x 6.25 in., [New York], n.d. On notepaper with only the address, 1 Park Avenue. Signed Martha Bacon, Mrs. Robert Bacon. Declining an invitation for some unspecified event (that apparently passed while they were out of town). Robert Bacon (1860-1919) was Secretary of State for a short time in 1909 after having served as Assistant Sec. of State for four years. Most of his career, however, was spent with J.P. Morgan, including participating in the formation of US Steel.

TLS, 5.5 x 8.5 in., Washington, Aug. 14, 1918. Signed by Paul H. Warburg (1868-1932). Born into a Jewish German banking family, Warburg early advocated the Federal Reserve System. In his role for a financial firm, he made frequent trips to New York, where he settled in 1902. In 1895 he had married Nina Loeb, daughter of one of the founders of Kuhn, Loeb & Co., where his brother-in-law Jacob Schiff was later a senior partner. He became a US citizen, but remained a partner in his family firm in Hamburg. He was influential in getting the Federal Reserve Act and its predecessors passed. From 1916 to August 9, 1918, he served as Vice Governor of the Federal Reserve Board. This note to Wiley likely refers to his resignation from the board. "The step which I had to take was not an easy one, but letters like yours strengthen my conviction that I did the right thing in circumstances which are trying for us all." Warburg was reportedly the model for Daddy Warbucks in Little Orphan Annie.

ALS, 5 x 8.25 in. stamped at top West Point, NY, and dated April 14, -04. Incomplete, as the signed page is not present. Note on verso indicates "Mills - West Point." Albert Leopold Mills (1854-1916) was an 1879 graduate of West Point. He rose to the rank of Major General and received the Medal of Honor for valor at Santiago, Cuba on 1 July 1898. After the Spanish-American War, he became Superintendent of West Point until 1906, and is buried in the cemetery there. His MOH was awarded because Mills was shot through the head, temporarily blinding him, at the Battle of San Juan Hill, but continued to command his troops. In what there is of this note, Mills is thanking Wiley for his letter of congratulations on Mills promotion to Brigadier General in January 1904.

Two TNsS, both on Department of State letterhead, 5.25 x 6.75 in.,  dated Jan. 14, 1903 and Nov. 19, 1907. Both from David J. Hill.

Two ALsS, 5.5 x 8.5 in., on Rhode Island Ave., Washington, DC stationery, dated Dec. 12 and Dec 22, 1918, from Juliet L.P. Hill, Mrs. David Jayne Hill.

David Jayne Hill (1850-1932) studied in Berlin and Paris after graduating from Bucknell University. He also received numerous honorary degrees later in his career. In 1903 he was appointed Minister to Switzerland (his likely destination as he wrote this note), later to the Netherlands and Luxembourg and Germany. Although long a "Washington insider," Hill was unsuccessful in his bid for a Senate seat from New York. His first wife, Anna (Liddell) died shortly after giving birth to their third child. Several years later, Hill married Juliet Lewis Packer. She also predeceased him, dying in 1923 after being struck by a delivery vehicle while crossing the street.

TNS, East Hampton, LI, July 26, 1933. On letterhead of and signed by William H. Woodin. William Hartman Woodin (1868-1934) spent most of his career in the family business, building railroad cars. Jackson & Woodin grew to the largest car builder in the East, later merging with a dozen other companies to form American Car and Foundry Co. (ACF). He was FDR's Secretary of the Treasury for a brief time. He also collaborated with Johnny Gruelle to put music to Raggedy Ann's Sunny Songs, becoming the namesake of Little Wooden Willie.

ANS, 2pp (5.5 x 7 in.) on Ritz-Carlton Hotel stationery, 31 March 1934. Sympathy to Wiley on the death of his mother, signed Marie Louise de Serrana? Pencil note on verso indicates "Ambassador from Cuba" but we have so far been unable to identify this person.

TNS, 5.5 x 6.75 in., Washington (DC), n.d. Signed George B. Cortelyou (1862-1940), Secretary of Commerce and Labor (1903-1904), Postmaster General (1905-1907), Secretary of the Treasury (1907-1909) under Roosevelt.

TLS, 7 x 9 in., on Dept of Commerce and Labor letterhead, also signed George B. Cortelyou.

TLS, 1p, on War Department, Chief of Staff, Military Intelligence Division letterhead, Washington (DC), 28 Aug. 1934. Signed Robert C. Richardson Jr., Lt. Col., General Staff. Robert Charlwood Richardson (1882-1954) graduated from USMA in 1904, and was sent to serve in the Philippines. He later saw service in both World Wars, in command of the Hawaiian Department of the Pacific at the height of the second World War (1943-1946) as a Lieutenant General. He was posthumously awarded a fourth star.

ANS, 4 x 5 in. note card and cover, both with red borders. Return address indicates the writer is Jouett Shouse (without which the handwriting would not be interpretable). Washington, 20 Dec. 1934 (postmark). Note: "With all good wishes for Christmas and the coming year." Jouett Shouse (1879-1968) was a publisher and politician, known for his opposition to the New Deal in the 1930s.

Western Union Telegraph, 30 Mar 1933, birthday greetings to Mrs. Regina Wiley from James W. Gerard. James Watson Gerard (1867-1951) was a New York lawyer and politician. In 1914, Gerard defeated Franklin D. Roosevelt in the Democratic primary for US Senator (but lost the election to James Wadsworth, Jr.). He was appointed Ambassador to Germany in 1913, and remained until 1917, just before the US declared war on Germany. After war broke out, Gerard handled British interests in Germany, providing much care to British POWs.

TNS, 1p, New York, Jan. 25, 1935, on letterhead of James W. Gerard and signed by him.

TNS, 5.5 x 8.75 in., on letterhead of the Agent General for Reparation Payments, Berlin, 15 Dec. 1927. Signed S. Parker Gilbert. Before serving as Agent General for Reparations Seymour Parker Gilbert (1892-1938) was Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, and afterward became an associate of J.P. Morgan. After his death of a heart attack at the age of 45, his widow married Harold Stanley, co-founder of Morgan Stanley.

TNS, 1p, on Treasury Department letterhead, New York, March 25, 1920. Signed simply "Bill." Pencil note: "File Wm. Edwards." William Hanford "Big Bill" Edwards (1877-1943) was a Princeton football star, who transitioned to officiating after graduation, refereeing some notable games such as Harvard-Yale and the first "Ohio League" championship game. He was the first president of the first iteration of the AFL (which only lasted that one season).

TLS, approx. 7 x 9 in., [Washington], May 11, 1934. Signed by Postmaster General James A. Farley (1888-1976). Farley was an early "success story" from the Irish Catholic community. He helped normalize diplomatic relations with the Vatican between the wars. During WWII as head of Coca Cola International, he greatly extended the reach of the company overseas by having Coke shipped with food and ammunition as a "war priority item" to boost troop morale.

ANS, 4.5 x 6.25 in., [New York], n.d. On notepaper with only the address, 1 Park Avenue. Signed Martha Bacon, Mrs. Robert Bacon. Declining an invitation for some unspecified event (that apparently passed while they were out of town). Robert Bacon (1860-1919) was Secretary of State for a short time in 1909 after having served as Assistant Sec. of State for four years. Most of his career, however, was spent with J.P. Morgan, including participating in the formation of US Steel.

TLS, 5.5 x 8.5 in., Washington, Aug. 14, 1918. Signed by Paul H. Warburg (1868-1932). Born into a Jewish German banking family, Warburg early advocated the Federal Reserve System. In his role for a financial firm, he made frequent trips to New York, where he settled in 1902. In 1895 he had married Nina Loeb, daughter of one of the founders of Kuhn, Loeb & Co., where his brother-in-law Jacob Schiff was later a senior partner. He became a US citizen, but remained a partner in his family firm in Hamburg. He was influential in getting the Federal Reserve Act and its predecessors passed. From 1916 to August 9, 1918, he served as Vice Governor of the Federal Reserve Board. This note to Wiley likely refers to his resignation from the board. "The step which I had to take was not an easy one, but letters like yours strengthen my conviction that I did the right thing in circumstances which are trying for us all." Warburg was reportedly the model for Daddy Warbucks in Little Orphan Annie.

ALS, 5 x 8.25 in. stamped at top West Point, NY, and dated April 14, -04. Incomplete, as the signed page is not present. Note on verso indicates "Mills - West Point." Albert Leopold Mills (1854-1916) was an 1879 graduate of West Point. He rose to the rank of Major General and received the Medal of Honor for valor at Santiago, Cuba on 1 July 1898. After the Spanish-American War, he became Superintendent of West Point until 1906, and is buried in the cemetery there. His MOH was awarded because Mills was shot through the head, temporarily blinding him, at the Battle of San Juan Hill, but continued to command his troops. In what there is of this note, Mills is thanking Wiley for his letter of congratulations on Mills promotion to Brigadier General in January 1904.

Two TNsS, both on Department of State letterhead, 5.25 x 6.75 in.,  dated Jan. 14, 1903 and Nov. 19, 1907. Both from David J. Hill.

Two ALsS, 5.5 x 8.5 in., on Rhode Island Ave., Washington, DC stationery, dated Dec. 12 and Dec 22, 1918, from Juliet L.P. Hill, Mrs. David Jayne Hill.

David Jayne Hill (1850-1932) studied in Berlin and Paris after graduating from Bucknell University. He also received numerous honorary degrees later in his career. In 1903 he was appointed Minister to Switzerland (his likely destination as he wrote this note), later to the Netherlands and Luxembourg and Germany. Although long a "Washington insider," Hill was unsuccessful in his bid for a Senate seat from New York. His first wife, Anna (Liddell) died shortly after giving birth to their third child. Several years later, Hill married Juliet Lewis Packer. She also predeceased him, dying in 1923 after being struck by a delivery vehicle while crossing the street.

TNS, East Hampton, LI, July 26, 1933. On letterhead of and signed by William H. Woodin. William Hartman Woodin (1868-1934) spent most of his career in the family business, building railroad cars. Jackson & Woodin grew to the largest car builder in the East, later merging with a dozen other companies to form American Car and Foundry Co. (ACF). He was FDR's Secretary of the Treasury for a brief time. He also collaborated with Johnny Gruelle to put music to Raggedy Ann's Sunny Songs, becoming the namesake of Little Wooden Willie.

Five TNsS from Seth Low, four on his East 64th Street letterhead, with dates of Feb. 6, 1908; May 26, 1908; Jan. 19, 1909; and Aug. 28, 1909. The last with Broad Brook Farm typed below. Fifth on Broad Brook Farm letterhead dated Nov. 19th, 1910. Seth Low (850-1916) was an educator and politician  who served as Mayor of Brooklyn, President of Columbia University, and Mayor of New York City. He also served as chairman of the Tuskegee Institute from 1907-1916. He was Vice President of the New York Academy of Sciences, President of the Archaeological Institute of America, and trustee of the Carnegie Institute (Washington, DC).

TLS, 1p, on State of New York, Executive Chamber letterhead, dated 29 March 1933. Signed by Herbert H. Lehman, Governor. Birthday greetings to Wiley's mother. Herbert Henry Lehman (1878 - 1963) was the 45th Governor of New York (1933-1942), previously serving as Lieut. Gov. with Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt. Subsequently he was elected to the US Senate to fill the seat previously held by John Foster Dulles.

Two TNsS, signed by Stewart L. Woodford, one on "The Hughes League of the United States" letterhead dated March 9, 1908, the other on Hotel Astor letterhead dated May 26, 1908. Stewart Woodford (1835 - 1913) was a New York City lawyer and politician (and influential one if his addresses are any indicator). He served through most of the Civil War, as chief-of-staff to Gen. Gillmore, then as Colonel of the 103rd Regt. USCT. After the end of the war, he was awarded a brevel Brig. General rank. Shortly after, he was elected Lieut. Gov. of New York, but his subsequent bid for Gov. was unsuccessful. He was elected to the US Congress, and later US Attorney for the Southern District of New York. McKinley appointed him as Minister to Spain in 1897, but diplomatic relations were severed the following year as the Spanish-American War began.

Three TLsS, by William D. Guthrie, all on Guthrie's letterhead. The first has no date, only "Locust Valley, Long Island," so may be from his summer home. This one also appears to be secretarially signed. The others are dated June 25, 1934 and Feb. 15, 1935. The first also has a holograph note added by Guthrie. William Dameron Guthrie (1859-1935) was American born, but educated in Paris and England as well as Columbia Law School. He was Storrs lecturer at Yale University in 1907-1908 and Ruggles Professor of Constitutional Law at Columbia from 1908-1922. He argued many cases before the US Supreme Court, including income tax, California irrigation, Illinois inheritance tax, oleomargarine, and many more. He also served as President of the New York Bar Association and as lawyer to the Rockefeller family.

ALS, 5.75 x 9 in., on "Law Office of Rosendale & Hessberg" letterhead, Albany, Oct. 22, 1894, signed S.M. Rosendale. Simon Wolfe Rosendale (1842-1937) was a lawyer and politician. He was born and for the most part made his career in Albany (NY). He became the first Jew elected to a state office, but was one of the prominent American Jews who argued against a Jewish state in Palestine, which was scheduled to be included in the Versailles Peace Conference in 1919. He was active in a number of American Jewish organizations, including the American Jewish Historical Society.

TNS, 5.5 x 8 in., n.p., August 11, 1934. Signed Joseph W. Cannon. Although not on letterhead, it appears Cannon was handling some of Wiley's communications at the Times while Wiley was away for a bit.

ANS, 5 x 6.5 in. note card with mourning border, Newport, Sept. 18th, n.y. Signed Ava Astor. Ava Lowle Willing Astor Ribblesdale (1868-1958) married Col. John Jacob Astor IV (1864-1912). The couple had two children, William Vincent and Ava Alice Muriel, but the marriage did not work and the couple divorced in 1910. Jack died on the RMS Titanic while returning from a honeymoon with his new bride, Madeleine. Ava and her daughter moved to England, and in 1919 she married Thomas Lister, 4th Baron Ribblesdale. After his death in 1925, she did not remarry. She returned to the States in 1940 as a war refugee, living for the remainder of her life as Lady Ribblesdale.

TNS, on Reynolds, "Stanchfield & Collin Attorneys and Counselors at Law, Elmira, NY," 18 Sept. 1900, signed John B. Stanchfield. Besides being an attorney, Stanchfield (1855-1921) served as Mayor of Elmira (1886-1888), and in the state Assembly (1895-1896). He was the unsuccessful candidate for Governor (1900) and the US Senate from New York in 1903. He was a delegate to several party and state conventions.

TNS, New York, Jan. 30, 1909. Signed John D. Rockefeller, Jr. "Junior," (1874-1960) as he was known most of his life, was raised in a family that was frugal in the extreme, even wearing his sisters' hand-downs for his early life. The family's values, however, instilled in him a sense of philanthropy that would change the perceptions of the Rockefeller name. His marriage to Abby Aldrich, daughter of the powerful Rhode Island senator, was hailed by newspapers as the new alliance of wealth and politics. Junior was in part responsible for creating the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, the Rockefeller Center among other buildings. He also helped restore Colonial Williamsburg and donated to Grand Teton and Acadia National Parks, among many other gifts.

ANS, Nov. 30, n.y. 4 x 5 in. card with mourning border. From Bernard M. Baruch. Bernard Mannes Baruch (1870 - 1965) was a financier and stock investor, plus statesman and political consultant. He often discussed government affairs while sitting on park benches in Central Park (NY) or Lafayette Park (DC), earning him the sobriquet of "park bench statesman." One of his "hobbies" was horse racing. Saratoga has a Bernard Baruch Handicap in his honor.

TLS, New York, June 6, 1921. On letterhead of and signed by Bernard Baruch. Concerning the letter sent by Louis Wiley concerning Mr. Baruch''s father's death.

Telegraph, 2pp, Postal Telegraph. From Thomas J. Watson, President of the Merchants' Association, to Mrs. Regina Wiley, birthday greetings. "Your son is one of my very best friends and his character and ability enable him to make valuable contributions to our American institutions...and I know that your influence has always been a great help to him."

ANS on 2.5 x 3.5 in. calling card, printed Mrs. Henry Morgenthau. Returning a napkin that she accidentally carried home the previous evening, and thanking Wiley for the delightful evening. Henry Morganthau (1856-1946) was a lawyer, businessman and US ambassador. He is best known for his stand against Armenian genocide while he was ambassador to the Ottoman Empire during WWI.

Three TNsS, from F.A. Vanderlip. One is letter on National City Bank letterhead, March 2, 1905 (also in header "Cable Address 'Citibank'") thanking Wiley for the clipping from the Times. The second is 1p, with address header, [New York], Jan 27, 1906, also thanking Wiley for another clipping from the "Times."  Third is a 4.5 x 7 in. card of the Metropolitan Club, New York, Dec. 16, 1919, telling Wiley how glad he and Mr. Taft and Mr. Morgenthau are that he is joining them for dinner Wednesday.

Frank Arthur Vanderlip (1864-1937) was born on a Midwest farm in Illinois. The family's poverty forced him to leave school and find work, in this case in a machine shop running a lathe for a few cents a day. He later worked through one year of school in mechanical engineering. He returned to the shop for $1.35 per day, studying shorthand at night. This led to his becoming a reporter for the local paper. At the paper he met Joseph French Johnson, dean of the school of commerce and finance at New York University. Johnson later became financial editor of the Chicago Tribune, and along the way brought the younger man with him. Another Chicago connection, Lyman Gage, Secretary of the Treasury, took Vanderlip with him to Washington as his secretary. The rest, as they say, is history. Vanderlip's abilities and hard work led him to become Assistant Secretary of the Treasury and President of National City Bank.

TLS with manuscript postscript, 1p, on Bruce Barton's letterhead, [New York], 4 August 1933.  Bruce Fairchild Barton (1886-1967) was an author and House Representative from New York, but is best known as an advertising executive. He created "Betty Crocker," and is credited with naming General Electric and General Motors.

Secretarial NS 5.75 x 9 in., New York, March 30, 1934, on American Smelting and Refining Co. letterhead. Signed Simon Guggenheim (President of Am. Smelting). Sympathy on death of his mother. John Simon Guggenheim (1867-1941) was a businessman, politician and philanthropist. He attended business school before moving to Colorado to work as an ore buyer for his father's mining and smelting company. He was elected to the Senate from Colorado, serving 1907-1913.

ANS, 5.5 x 8 in., Rochester, July 7, 1893, Raines Bros., Counselors at Law, Rochester, NY letterhead. Telling Wiley that Prof. Chapin will not come to his office as scheduled. Signed George Raines (1846- 1908). George served in the State senate and as District Attorney of Monroe County (NY). His brother, John, was a Congressman and Thomas was State Treasurer.

TLS, 1p, New York, Nov. 10, 1921, on Jerome, Rand & Kresel letterhead, signed Wm. Travers Jerome. William Travers Jerome (1859-1934) was a New York lawyer and politician. His cousin was Jennie Jerome, who became Lady Randolph Churchill and the mother of Winston Churchill and John Spencer-Churchill.

TLS, 1p, New York, April 23, 1914. On Kuhn, Loeb & Co. letterhead. Signed Felix M. Warburg.  Felix Moritz Warburg (1871-1937) was another member of the Hamburg banking family. He married Fried Schiff, who took over the philanthropic endeavors of the Loeb-Schiff-Warburg families.

TLS, 1p, New York, August 27, 1934, on Wendell P. Colton Company letterhead. Signed W.P. Colton thanking Wiley for letters of introduction for his son, Wendell, Jr. in Paris and London. The Colton company was an advertising firm, known in the early part of the 20th century for cards it developed for street car advertising. One of the images was of a young woman dressed in white, passenger on the Lackawanna RR. At the time, rail travel was loud, dirty and exhausting. They created this young woman, and gave her  a name - Phoebe Snow - to suggest that rail travel could be civilized.

TLS, 1p, New York, August 24, 1934, on Chemical Bank & Trust letterhead, signed by company President, Percy H. Johnston. Percy Hampton Johnston (1880-1957) did more to extend the presence and holdings of Chemical Bank than all of the leaders before him. He opened branches closer to where people were (including Chicago and London), he added securities and a trust department. By the end of WWII, when Johnston was also reaching mandatory retirement age, Chemical Bank was the 7th largest bank in the US.

TNS, 1p, [New York], Feb. 7, 1935, on Root, Clark, Buckner & Ballantine letterhead. Signed Emory R. Buckner (1877-1941). Buckner served as US Attorney for the Southern District of New York, and built a reputation as one of the greatest prosecutors in America. He also mentored many lawyers who would go on to greatness on their own, and became known collectively as "Buckner's Boys."

TLS, 1p, New York, Dec. 7, 1905. On Equitable Life Assurance Society letterhead. Signed by President Paul Morton (1857-1911). Morton had been vice president of the Santa Fe Railroad, then was selected by TR as his Secretary of the Navy. A scandal involving illegal rebates forced Morton out of office, and he became President of the Equitable Life Assurance Society.  This association came under state investigation after a number of complaints were made that the member companies were charging large amounts of money on corporate accounts for things such as costume balls. Of course, in the process, other questionable practices were also uncovered. In this letter, Morton declines Wiley's offer for advertising space in the Times' Annual Financial Review. "I am going to stick to the rule laid down that so long as the Legislative Investigation is on, and the newspapers are filled up with sensational articles on insurance in their news columns, we will not spend any money trying to offset it in their advertising columns."

ANS, 5.5 x 8.25 in., on letterhead of Daniel Frohman Lyceum Theatre and signed by Frohman. Daniel Frohman (1851-1940) was a producer of theatre and early film.

TNS, 5.5 x 7 in., New York, Jan. 7, 1935, on US Steel Corporation letterhead. Signed by Myron Charles Taylor (1874-1959). In addition to his legal and industrial activities, Taylor also represented the United States in Europe in 1938, in an attempt to address the problem of Jewish refugees fleeing Hitler's German. He was then sent to the Vatican as Roosevelt's, the Truman's, personal envoy (and granted ambassador status by the Holy See). Initially he was to try to dissuade Italy from entering the war; later he tried to get the Pope to speak out against German atrocities against Jews in particular, but everyone. He was successful in keeping Spain from joining the Axis powers. Taylor officially retired in 1950.

 TLS, 2pp, New York, Jan. 30, 1935, on Sheffield and Betts, Counsellors at Law letterhead. Request for a position for a family associate (his butler's son), plus request for an early speaking time at an upcoming dinner. Signed James Sheffield. James Rockwell Sheffield (1864-1938) was also a New York assemblyman and Ambassador to Mexico (1924-1927), as well as being a lawyer. He twice declines appointments to the federal bench.

TLS, 1p, New York, 22 Jan. 1935, on letterhead of "Arthur Williams, Brook Corners, Roslyn LI." Signed Arthur Williams. Thank you for the Christmas gift, a book, some of the high points of which are mentioned. Arthur Williams was Vice President and General Manager of New York Edison, having been with the company when it was still Edison Illuminating Company. Although trained as an electrical engineer, Williams' role with NY Edison was in a business capacity. He was also a founder and the first President of the National Association of Corporation Schools.

TNS, 5.25 x 6.75 in., New York, Feb. 20, 1935. On letterhead of Mrs. Victor Morawetz. Signed Majorie Nott Morawetz. Victor Morawetz (1859-1938) was a lawyer, author of law-related books, and railway manager.

TNS, 1p, Hoboken (NJ), Jan. 22, 1935, on First National Bank of Hoboken letterhead. Signed Ogden H. Hammond, president of the bank. Ogden Haggerty Hammond (1869-1956) served four terms in the US House representing New Jersey and was appointed Ambassador to Spain (1925-1929), in addition to his position at the bank. On 1 May 1915, Hammond and his wife, Mary, boarded the RMS Lusitania in New York, bound for Liverpool where Mary intended to aid victims of WWI. The Lusitania was torpedoed by a German submarine. Ogden survived; Mary did not.

TNS, 5.5 x 8.25 in., New York, Oct. 23, 1931, on letterhead of Emma E. Goodwin. Initialed by a secretary.

TNS, 5 x 7.75 in., Baltimore (MD), June 30, 1932. On letterhead and signed by Daniel Willard (1861-1942). Willard was President of B & O RR and served on a number of government railroad commissions.

ANS, 3pp, 5 x 6.5 in., New York, March 29, 1934. On Doctor's Hospital letterhead. Signed J.W. Harriman. Sympathy on the death of his mother. Joseph Wright Harriman (1867-1949) was president of Harriman National Bank and Trust Company. His uncle was railroad tycoon E.H. Harriman. His cousin was diplomat and New York Governor W. Averell Harriman. In the first years of the Great Depression, Harriman Bank banded with eight other small banks, vowing to support each other. Harriman deteriorated and J.W. was pushed out of his position as president, but remained Chairman of the Board. In March 1933 he was charged with falsifying the bank's books and making unauthorized charges against depositors' accounts, he said to try to maintain the value of the bank's stock. His lawyer, William "Wild Bill" Donovan maintained that Harriman was too ill to stand trial, with either coronary thrombosis or a nervous breakdown - or both. He walked away from a nursing home just as the trial was about to begin. He was located and stabbed himself in a reported suicide attempt as they took him into custody. He was taken to another hospital for treatment, even as his lawyer made another attempt to argue that Harriman was too ill to stand trial. He walked away from that nursing home, also. The judge decided Harriman was competent, and the trial began in May 1934. This note was written just before the trial, the letterhead paper presumably from one of the two hospitals in which he was held for treatment or evaluation. (The note is perfectly lucid with firm handwriting.) Harriman was found guilty and sentenced to 4 1/2 years in prison, although he only served about half of that. The rest of his life was spent selling cars.

TNS, 1p, New York, July 3, 1929, on letterhead of Edward L. Bernays and signed by him. Edward Louis James Bernays (1891-1995) was a public relations consultant, referred to by some as the "father of public relations." He was the nephew of Sigmund Freud and Philipp, Emanuel, Alexander and Julius Freud. He combined ideas then forming in the fields of psychoanalysis (Sigmund Freud) with ideas of researchers in the field of crowd psychology to design "persuasion campaigns." Life Magazine named him one of the 100 most influential Americans of the 20th century.

TNS, 1p, New York, 16 Sept. 1899. Office of Charles Frohman Empire Theatre letterhead. Signed Charles Frohman, to Louis Wiley. Short note telling Wiley to come see him any morning before 11 am.

TNS, 1p, New York, 30 March 1934. Brock Pemberton Avon Theatre letterhead. Brock Pemberton extends sympathy (death of Wiley's mother).

TNS, 1p, Hollywood, CA, 17 July 1933. Mary Pickford, on her own letterhead. Thanking Louis Wiley for his letter and for thinking about her. Mary Pickford was one of the "superstar" actresses of the early part of the century, and still ranks high in various lists of all-time greatest female stars of Hollywood. She was also one of the founders of United Artists studio and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Two ANsS, [New York]. Ernestine Schumann Heink (1861-1936). One on 4 x 6 in. card, printed The Buckingham, New York. Dated 22 June 1930. The note is in part German, part English. Wiley's parents were both born in Germany, so even if he was not fluent (we suspect he was at least bilingual if not multilingual), his mother could have translated it for him. Second note is on 5.5 x 6.5 in. note paper with Ernestine's name printed on it. Dated April 1, 1934, no place stated. Sympathy on the loss of his mother. Ernestine Schumann Heink was born Ernestine Rossler  in Bohemia (now part of Prague, Czech Republic). Through political and personal upheaval, she became an acclaimed opera singer (contralto).

ANS, 2pp, 4.5 x 7 in. N.d., n.p. Thanking him for a notice of their company, and enclosing complementary tickets. Signed Mary Moore.

ANS, 4 x 6 in. card, printed with David Warfield and his New York address. With cover. Nov. 28, 1937. Thank you to Claire Wiley for her gift and sentiments. Signed David Warfield.  David Warfield (1866-1951) was a stage actor, born in San Francisco, CA. He worked primarily on the New York stages, and became known for comedic roles.

Two ANsS from Eleanor Robson Belmont.  One on note paper with her initials upper left, Hempstead, L.I., n.d. Second on note paper with 270 Park Avenue address only. Mrs. Belmont is writing to decline an invitation to speak at the 23rd annual dinner of the Society of the Genesee. The Society was founded by Louis Wiley in 1897, so the 23rd meeting should have been 1919 or 1920 (depending on whether they counted 1897 as the first annual dinner). Eleanor Robson Belmont (1879-1979) was born in England, but moved to the States as a young girl. She worked on states from Honolulu to Milwaukee before her debut in New York in 1900. She retired when she married August Belmont in 1910. After his death, she worked with the Opera's Board of Directors.

TLS, 2pp, with cartoon header. 14 Nov. 1934. Probably New York, but not stated. Signed by Hendrick Willem van Loon. Seeking support for his University of the Air, WEVD. Van Loon was a Journalist, historian, lecturer.

TLS 1p, New York, March 31, 1934. On letterhead of and signed by William T Dewart. An interesting letter, congratulating Mrs. Wiley on her 85th birthday. Mr. Dewart apparently did not get word of her death. Most of the letters of sympathy are dated 30 or 31 March or 1 April, suggesting she died about the 28th or 29th (could not find her exact date of death).

TLS with manuscript postscript, 2pp, 6.5 x 9.5 in. Plainfield, NJ, 23 Dec. 1921. from Shaw Desmond (1877-1960). Thanking Wylie for his note on "Gods" and for putting Desmond in tough with Bernard Baruch. Desmond was an Irish novelist, and in some ways seems to be better known as a founder of paranormal research in the US.

Two ANsS, one on 3.5 x 6 in. card accepting an invitation. Only has April 5th, n.y. Second is 6 x 6.75 in., Jan 21, 45, addressed to Miss Wiley. Both with printed Bryant Baker and addresses (one Gainsborough Studios on W. 59th St., the other, 222 Central Park South. Bryant Baker (1881-1970) was a sculptor born in London into a family of sculptors. His father and grandfather both worked on wood and stone carvings at Westminster Abbey. His brother, Robert, also became a sculptor. Bryant's best-known work is Pioneer Woman in Ponca City, OK, although he carved many more.

TLS, 1p, Paris, 17 Dec. 1934. Herbert Haseltine (1877-1962) was born in Italy, educated at Harvard, and died in Paris. He is best known as an equestrian sculptor, but also sculpted other animals. Some of his famous statues are "Man o' War" and "George Washington on Horseback."

ANS, 5.25 x 7 in., 30 March 1934. Sympathy on death of Wiley's mother. Signed simply "Duveen." Appears to be Joseph Duveen, 1st Baron Duveen (1869-1939), British art dealer. Duveen is credited with being the first to realize that Europe had lots of art, America had lots of money. He made his fortune shipping European art to the states, and his acquisitions even today are the core of many museum collections.

Two TLsS, 1p each, by William T. Manning, Diocese of New York, Synod House letterhead, Jan. 27, 1927 and May 17, 1927. Both Thank you notes. William Thomas Manning (1866 - 1949) was the US Episcopal bishop of New York (1921-1946).

TLS, 1p, on Church of the Ascension (NY) letterhead, 17 May 1920, signed Percy Stickney Grant. Percy Grant (1860-1927) was a priest of the Episcopal Church. He had a liberal/socialist view that rubbed the organization of the church the wrong way. When he instituted forums at the church on Sunday evenings to allow people to discuss issues of the day - any issues, the church organization finally banned them (when he had a Muslim leader speak). Grant fell in love with a divorcee, and when Bishop Manning refused to authorize the marriage, Grant resigned from the church (1924). This was over a decade before Edward VIII's abdication to marry a divorcee, but it illustrates the Christian view of divorce in the first half of the 20th century.

ANS, 4.25 x 5.5 in. card, printed at top "Cardinal Hayes." Sympathy on the death of his mother (reply dated 4/2/34, but card not dated). Patrick Joseph Hayes (1867 - 1938) was a Roman Catholic Cardinal. He was Archbishop of New York from 1919 until his death, being made Cardinal in 1924. He is best known for expanding the program of Catholic charities. He always kept his focus local, shunning the national spotlight. He was interred under the altar of St. Patrick's Cathedral after an earlier interment in the chapel at his summer camp. Cardinal Hayes High School in the Bronx bears his name.

LS, 2pp (6.25 x 8 in.), secretarial letter signed by Stephen S. Wise,  New York, April 2, 1934. Also sympathy at death of his mother. Stephen Samuel Wise (1874 - 1949) was a Reform Rabbi & early Zionist. Founded Jewish Institute of Religion which later merged into Hebrew Union College the year after his death.

Letter on page (8 x 11 in.") that may have been removed from a larger volume. "For my friend Mr. Louis Wiley. This book is an example of what an advertising agency can do for the Police Department - in Volunteer Service. I wish you would read this Book and then write Police Commissioner Whalen. Yours in Friendship. Copy written by J.A. Ballantyne / W.E. Mackee / Wm H. Rankin / Layout by Paul L. Holder Art Director. See bottom page 46." with names bracketed and "WHRCo." to the side. Left edge has been torn (from book?).

TLS, 1p, approx. 7 x 9 in., on Paul Block, 247 Park Ave., New York letterhead. NY, May 16, 1927. Paul Block (1877-1941) published smaller papers (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Toledo Blade - mentioned in this letter, and others). He eventually formed Block Communications. He was close to W.R. Hearst, even sharing a mistress- not necessarily at the same time. Block would even become Hearst's executor.

TLS, 1p, on Leo Wise & Co. Publishers letterhead and signed by Leo Wise. Wise published the American Israelite (Cincinnati) and The Chicago Israelite (Chicago). Wise's sister was married to Adolph Ochs (NY Times). These two were children of Isaac M. Wise, founder of Reform Judaism in America.

TLS, 1p, on Editor & Publisher letter head, "The Oldest Publishers' and Advertisers Journal in America." July 16, 1934. Signed James W. Brown and signed in type "James Wright Brown."

TNS, 1p (5.5 x 7.75 in.), New York Herald Tribune letterhead. Signed W[alter] Lippmann. 25 May 1934. Walter Lippmann (1889-1974) was a writer and reporter. He is credited with coining the concept of the Cold War and "stereotype," and was the winner of two Pulitzer prizes.

Two TNsS, 1p, on Associated Press letterhead, signed by Melville E. Stone. 12 April 1916 and 19 April 1917. 

ANS, 1p, (7.25 x 8 in.) Rochester Printing Company letterhead. 22 May 1900. Signed N.P. Pond. Wiley's first jobs in the newspaper business came in Rochester.

TNS, 1p (7.25 x 8.25 in.). On The World letterhead, 9 May 1903. Signed Don C. Seitz. Don Carlos Seitz (1862-1935) worked in a number of smaller newspapers. He came to the New York World from the Brooklyn World, and served as its advertising manager (1895-97) and business manager (1898 -1 935).

Two TNsS, 1p (8 x 10.5 in.). on The World letterhead, 6 July 1916 and 27 Dec. 1916. Signed by Ralph Pulitzer. Pulitzer (1879-1939) was the son of Joseph Pulitzer, and took over as President of the company which published the New York World and Evening World after Joseph's death.

TNS, 1p (8 x 10.5 in.) on The World letterhead, 10 Nov. 1916. Signed Herbert Bayard Swope. Swope (1882-1958) spent most of his career at The World and received the first Pulitzer Prize (and two more). He would establish the modern "op-ed" format opposite the standard editorial page.

ANS, 2pp, (4.5 x 7 in.) London, 9 Nov. 1921. Holograph letter signed Charles Grasty, who has been named among the great publishers such as Pulitzer and Hearst.

TLS, 1p, on Brooklyn Times Union letterhead, 16 Feb. 1935. Signed Joseph J. Early, editor. Early (d. 1949) was president of The Brooklyn Standard Union from 1924-1927 and represented the New York State Publishers Association and Associated Dailies of New York State.

TNS, 1p, on Hotel Elysee New York letterhead. 12 May 1934. Signed Walter Duranty. Duranty (1884-1957) was a NY Times reporter who won a Pulitzer Prize in 1932 for a series of reports on the Soviet Union. Later, there were calls to revoke the award, and a later generation of Times managers would say that they would never have published the series (sounds like 20-20 hindsight to us).

TNS, 1p, on Le Soleil letterhead. 21 Aug. 1924. Signed Henri Gagnon, Managing Director.

TNS, 1p, on The News Leader, Richmond, VA. 24 Aug.1934. Signed Stewart Bryan. John Stewart Bryan was President and publisher fo the News Leader.

ALS, 1p, on Arthur Hays Sulzberger's personal letterhead, 30 March 1932. Wishing Mrs. Wiley a happy birthday. Arthur H. Sulzberger (1891-1968) was publisher of the New York Times from 1935 to 1961. He was married to Iphigene Ochs, Adolph Ochs' daughter, and took over the Times when his father-in-law died.

ANS, 1p, on S. Roland Hall - Easton - Pennsylvania letterhead. 25 Aug. 1934. S.Roland Hall. Samuel Roland Hall (1879-1942) had been an editor, but lists his writings at the bottom of his letterhead, and seemed to think of himself more as an author.

4 x 5.25 in. card with etching of New York Times Annex. INside is the poem "The New York Times Grace Before Meal" by John Finley. Signed A. Kuransky?

O Lord, the Giver of All Good
   In whose just Hands are all our Times,

We thank Thee for our daily Food
   Gathered [as News] from many Climes.

Bless All of Us around this Board
   And All beneath this ample Roof; -

What we find fit to print, O Lord,
   Is, after all, the Pudding's Proof.

 

May those we welcome come again
And Those who stay be glad, Amen.

Six TLsS, signed by Seth Low, five on Low's E. 64th St. letterhead dated Jan 21, 1907; Jan 23rd, 1908; Jan 10, 1910; Mar. 28th, 1910; Dec. 26th, 1913; and May 14th, 1914 on Low's Broad Brook Farm letterhead. Seth Low (850-1916) was an educator and politician  who served as Mayor of Brooklyn, President of Columbia University, and Mayor of New York City. He also served as chairman of the Tuskegee Institute from 1907-1916. He was Vice President of the New York Academy of Sciences, President of the Archaeological Institute of America, and trustee of the Carnegie Institute (Washington, DC).

Calling card, 2 x 3 in., addressed to "Miss Wiley." Printed with Mr. and Mrs. William H. Vanderbilt, which has been crossed out. Note reads: "Bill and I want to thank you again for a most delightful evening. It was such a pleasure meeting you. Always Sincerely Anne Vanderbilt." Dated only "Wednesday." William Kissam Vanderbilt (1849-1920) married Alva Smith in 1875. They were married for 20 years before separating in 1895. Alva later married Oliver Hazard Perry Belmont and was known for her activity in the women's suffrage movement. Vanderbilt then married Anne Harriman Sands in 1903. They remained married until his death. William managed the family railroad investments. He, like many other Vanderbilts, built large houses, including "Marble House" (designed by Richard Morris Hunt) in Newport, RI. Anne appears to be using up some of her father-in-law's old calling cards.

ANS, 5.25 x 7.75 in., 640 Fifth Avenue letterhead, March 31, 1934. Cornelius Vanderbilt IV (1898 - 1974), also known as "Jr." and "Neil" by his family and friends, desired nothing more than a "normal" life. In 1935, he published Farewell to Fifth Avenue, which was an expose and rejection of early 20th century high society. Neil served in both World Wars. To his mother's horror, he enlisted in the Army in 1917 and served, including 3 months in France, until the end, 1919. By the time the second war rolled around, he was, of course, older, but enlisted anyway and was assigned to the intelligence corps, which certainly tapped his investigative journalism skills.  He was not very successful at family life, however, having seven wives between 1920 and his death.

TSL, 1p, on Cornell University letterhead, President's Office, 21 Nov. 1927. Re: speaking at the Society of the Genesee. Signed Livingston Farrand. Farrand (1867-1939) was a man of many interests (and the intersections among them). He received his undergraduate degree from Princeton, then went on to the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, earning his MD. He studied further at the Universities of Cambridge and Berlin. He was Adjunct Professor of Psychology at Columbia, and hooked up with Franz Boas on expeditions to the Pacific Northwest. In 1903 he became professor of anthropology, a position he held for more than a decade. He later served on the National Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis (1905), and he left his anthropology post to become President of the University of Colorado for the next five years. He continued working in the field of Public Health, expanding to International Health during WWI. In 1921 he became president of Cornell University, rapidly growing enrollments and international study.

ALS, 3pp (6.5 x 8.25 in.), New York, July 18, [1927]. Mary Cass Canfield to Louis Wiley. Mary Cass Canfield was an author, critic and journalist in the first half of the 20th century. Her best-known publication was "Grotesques and other reflections on art and the theatre," 1927. In this letter she is asking Wiley if the Times is planning to review her book, because of the influence of the Book Review.

Five TLsS from Stewart L. Woodford. The first in on Hudson-Fulton Celebration Commission letterhead. Woodford was President of the Commission. The letter was written from the Waldorf-Astoria Oct. 2, during the celebration (25 Sept. - 9 Oct.) thanking Wiley for his letter the previous day. Ritch, Woodfor, Bovee & Butcher, 18 Wall Street letterhead, Dec. 13, 1905. Three on Woodford, Bovee & Butcher, 1 Madison Avenue letterhead with dates of Dec. 29, 1910, Jan. 22, 1911 and Jan. 24, 1911. Stewart Woodford (1835 - 1913) was a New York City lawyer and politician (and influential one if his addresses are any indicator). He served through most of the Civil War, as chief-of-staff to Gen. Gillmore, then as Colonel of the 103rd Regt. USCT. After the end of the war, he was awarded a brevel Brig. General rank. Shortly after, he was elected Lieut. Gov. of New York, but his subsequent bid for Gov. was unsuccessful. He was elected to the US Congress, and later US Attorney for the Southern District of New York. McKinley appointed him as Minister to Spain in 1897, but diplomatic relations were severed the following year as the Spanish-American War began.

TNS, 5 x 8 in., on Columbia University letterhead, Faculty of Political Science, 20 May, 1933. Signed Allan Nevins. Joseph Allan Nevins (1890-1971) was an historian and journalist, known especially for his histories of the Civil War and biographies of people such as Grover Cleveland, Hamilton Fish, Henry Ford, John D. Rockefeller, etc. He worked at various publications in New York: New York Evening Post, The Nation, New York Sun, New York World, and more. He left publishing to join the staff of Columbia in 1929 and remained until his mandatory retirement age in 1958. He wrote more than 50 books, and an estimated 1000 articles, plus supervised over 100 doctoral dissertations.

Calling card (1.5 x 2.75 in.) with Mr. Arthur Wickes Rossiter crossed out and holograph message to Wiley. "Thank you for your kind note of sympathy, which I appreciate very much. Sincerely yours Arthur W. Rossiter." Arthur Rossiter was born in Flushing, LI, in 1874, the son of a prominent railroad man. He joined the banking firm of J.W. Davis & Co. He married Alice Riggs Colgate (1877-1926). Rossiter died in 1955 in Glen Cove, NY.

TNS, 1p, on Hall of Fame: New York University, Office of the Director - Robert Underwood Johnson. 16 Jan. 1935. Signed RA Johnson. Johnson (1853-1937) was a writer and editor. He joined the staff of The Century Magazine and worked his way to the editorial chair on the death of Richard Gilder in 1913. He teamed up with John Muir to establish Yosemite NP and start the Sierra Club. Johnson was also influential in establishing International Copyright law.

ANS, 5.5 x 8 in. New York University Office of the Chancellor letterhead. 27 Dec. 1916. Signed Elmer E. Brown. Get-well note. Elmer Ellsworth Brown (1861-1934) began his career in public schools in Belvidere, IL, and was Assistant State Secretary of the IL YMCA. When he moved to the collegiate level, he taught in the education department. He helped reorganize the U.S. Bureau of Education before becoming chancellor of New York University, retiring in 1933. He died the following year.

Transatlantic cable (?) to Louis Wiley thanking him for his birthday greetings. Signed in type Edward P. From Buckingham palace, "17 6" (June 17), no year. Brownish paper with serrated tears on both short sides (fine serrations, like a roll of wrap - wax paper, parchment, etc. - in today's market). It is not clear whether the"P" should be an "R," which Edward used during his short reign, or if it has other significance (Prince?). Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David was born on 23 June 1894 (d. 1972), so he is the likely writer from Buckingham Palace. His grandfather, Edward VII, was born in November.

Holiday (New Year) greeting from Mr. & Mrs. Alfred C. Bossom. 7 x 9.5 elaborately designed card with "Understanding / Forbearance / Co-operation" on banners strung between Big Ben in London (with a US shield above) and the Capitol building in Washington (with a Union Jack above). Lower half with a globe and "English speaking Peoples! The future peace of the world is in your hands." Lower box "As 1926 goes by may it be filled for you with happiness & repose. / from Mr. & Mrs. Alfred C. Bossom / 270 Park Ave./ New York." Across the bottom are symbols that appear to be hieroglyphics. Printed as a blueprint.

Alfred Charles Bossom (1881-1965) was born in London who came to work for Carnegie Steel in Pittsburgh in 1903. He is known for his work on the restoration of Fort Ticonderoga a few years later. His architectural specialty was efficient construction of skyscrapers. He built major structures in New York, Dallas, Buffalo, Richmond (VA), Houston, Galveston, and more. He returned to England in 1926 so his children could be educated there. His first wife died in a plane crash in 1932. His second marriage ended in divorce. In 1953 he gave away Margaret Roberts at her marriage; she became Margaret Thatcher on that occasion and later Prime Minister of Britain. He died in London in 1965.

TNS H.G. Armstrong. On letterhead Queen Anne's mansions, St. James's Park, S.W. 1 [London]. Sympathy over the death of Wiley's mother. Harry Gloster Armstrong (1861-1938) was the British consul-general in New York from 1920-1931. After service in the British Army (1878-1884) he became a Shakespearean actor. Left the stage for New York working for the Manchester Ship Canal Company. In 1919 he became Consul-General at Boston, an din 1920 was transferred to New York. (K.B.E. 1923; K.C.M.G. 1931) [from his Obituary in The Tablet, 12 Feb. 1938]

 

Last item is not exactly British. ANS on 6 x 8 in. paper with mourning border. Upper border with geometric device and "12 West 56th Street." No date other than possibly "Jan. 18." Signed Ava Astor. Note is thanking Wiley for sending a clipping from the Times Editorial Page. Ava Lowle Willing Astor Ribblesdale (1868-1958) married Col. John Jacob Astor IV (1864-1912). The couple had two children, William Vincent and Ava Alice Muriel, but the marriage did not work and the couple divorced in 1910. Jack died on the RMS Titanic while returning from a honeymoon with his new bride, Madeleine. Ava and her daughter moved to England, and in 1919 she married Thomas Lister, 4th Baron Ribblesdale. After his death in 1925, she did not remarry. She returned to the States in 1940 as a war refugee, living for the remainder of her life as Lady Ava Ribblesdale.

Calling card 2 x 3.25 in., printed La Comtesse Mercati. Manuscript note in English: "I am hoping the New Year will bring you Happiness. ??? Mercati / 15 East 36."

Note card, 6. x 6.5 in., "With all our very best wishes for 1935. Paul / Olga Thank you so much for sending us those nice articles. We so appreciated your thought. Thank you also for remaining such a good & ??? friend." According to pencil note on verso, this is Prince Paul of Yugoslavia.

ANS, 5.5 x 8.5 in. No date. ON Spanish Embassy, Washington letterhead. "Dear Mr. Wiley - It was terribly nice of you to remember about Glass's Speech. Thank you so much. It is a good speech. Very sincerely, M. Langkjar."

TLS 1p, 8.25 x 10.75 in. London, 15 August 1934. On Belgian Embassy letterhead. Manuscript address and closing, as well as signature. Middle part is typed. "How sweet of you to send me your kind note after the death of my dear friend and colleague Paul May. He and I served together in many posts... and his death is a terrible blow to me.... As always, I remain yours very truly, Ed Cartier."

TLS, 8.5 x 11 in. Salle Royale de la Renommee, Liege letterhead. Signed Jos. Kruyen.  Liege, 23 July 1920. "...I send you by same post a few photographs of the last Fort of Liege, taken by the germans; it was surrounded for 16 days, and never surrended [sic]. The germans had to blow the all Fort up to be able to take it. 350 bodies of soldiers are sill lying under the ruins. A committee has be formed to erect a monument to the glorious defensors of the Fort..." Asking if Wylie will put the information in the paper so people may send donations.

Second letter from the same group in French. Also signed by Jos. Kruyen and secretary Gerard Verdie.

 

TNS, 5.5 x 8.25 in., Legation Imperiale de Perse / Washington letterhead (Imperial Persian Legation) 22 Jan. 1935. Thanking Wiley for sending his letter to the editorial department, which published it without delay. Signed G. Dyalal (?)

etter from the Hamburg-American Line to Louis Wiley re: booking staterooms. 5 July 1899.

Letter from the "Bureau Francais de Reneignements," New York (French Bureau of Intelligence). Letter of introduction or approval for Louis Wiley to travel to France. 7 May 1924.

Letter from US Department of State, to Diplomatic and Consular Officers. For Miss Claire Wiley. This letter was torn in half lengthwise, with tape repair on verso.

Oscar Tschirky (1866-1950). 7 June 1928, on Waldorf-Astoria letterhead. Addressed "To My Brother Hotelmen in Europe, and to Whoever it may Concern." Asking for them to make Mrs. Wiley and her three daughters comfortable. Signed "Oscar of the Waldorf Astoria." Oscar Tschirky was born in Switzerland, and immigrated to New York in 1883. He began as Maitre d'hotel at Delmonico's before working at the Waldorf-Astoria. He was widely known not only in New York, but in the world, as "Oscar at the Waldorf."

Letter from the British Consulate General, New York, 9 June 1928 informing their colleagues in Britain that Misses Belle, Fannie and Claire Wiley will be sailing on the S/S France and to please show them any consideration and advice.

Letter from the German Legation in Washington, 13 June 1928, informing them that the three girls, sisters of Business Manager Louis Wiley of the New York Times, will be traveling in Germany.

Letter from the German Consul General, New York, 13 June 1928. Similar message that the three women will be traveling in Germany.

Partially printed letter from the French ambassador in Washington, DC, 8 June 1928 letting their counterparts in France know that the three women will be traveling there.

Letter from the Consul General of France in New York, 9 June 1928, that the three women, sisters of Louis Wiley, "Officier de la Legion d'Honneur" and director of the New York Times, will be traveling in France.

Letter from the Belgian Ambassador introducing the Wileys, 7 June 1928.

Letter from the Belgian Consulate in New York introducing the Wileys, 11 June 1928.

Letter from the Legation of the Netherlands introducing the Wileys, sisters of Louis Wiley, Business Manager of the New York Times. Washington, DC, 9 June 1928.

 

Letter from the Consulate General of the Netherlands, New York. 11 June 1928, introducing the Wiley sisters. This letter in English. "I should highly appreciate it if you would make their sojourn in the Netherlands as agreeable and profitable as possible by drawing up a sight seeing plan which will direct them to such principal points of interest to tourists as their stay in the Netherlands will permit them to visit." W.P. Montyn (typed and signed).

 

Louis Wiley was born in Homell, Steuben County, NY in 1869. The family moved shortly after to Mt. Sterling, KY, then to Ft. Wayne, IN. Even as a child, he left an impression on all with whom he came in contact as energetic, enthusiastic and always trying to do his best. He decided in childhood that he wanted to be in the newspaper business. His father died when he was 17, and the family moved to Rochester, where he began working for the Union and Advertiser, and soon moved to the Post Express, while also publishing his own paper, Jewish Tidings.

By the age of 26, he decided to try his luck in the "Big Apple." So, with a pile of recommendations solicited from everyone he knew, he struck out on his own, away from family and friends. He immediately went to work for the New York Sun, but found that it did not offer the opportunity he was seeking, so he looked elsewhere. In one of those fortuitous historically important events, the New York Times, which had been losing money for a long time, was taken over by Adolph S. Ochs, and he saw Wiley's energy as just what the Times needed for a revival, although he remained skeptical about Wiley's business sense.

Wiley knew this was his "calling" as it were, and by 1906 he was the Times' business manager, a position he held until his sudden death in 1935. Ochs and Wiley did rescue the paper, although not always in agreement on the direction it should take. Ochs, for example, did not like ads that contained testimonials, nor did he like colored comics, both of which Wiley favored.

Eventually Wiley became proficient in all aspects of the newspaper business, and in addition to being a writer occasionally, he was an excellent public speaker and would go anywhere at any time and positively represent the newspaper. With his energy and all of his connections, he was a favorite, not only of New York, but of the world. He was given awards by nearly every nation in Europe. He was also extremely organized, with file cabinets full of communication from many of these sources.

After Louis Wiley's death, many of the papers that were deemed as having "sentimental significance" were returned to their writers. Likely the Times kept a number of them. Many of the remainder were donated to the University of Rochester Library, and most of this summary is from their introduction to the collection. A more extensive biography is available there. But even after a decade or more, apparently additional items were found among Wiley's possessions.

 

Condition:

Most are in good condition with light toning, soiling, and typical folds. 

Price Realized Including Buyer's Premium
$510
10/06/2016